Blog Idea – Golf Clash Gemmes http://golfclashgemmes.com/ Wed, 18 May 2022 01:45:08 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://golfclashgemmes.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-1.png Blog Idea – Golf Clash Gemmes http://golfclashgemmes.com/ 32 32 Mahindra XUV700 EV digital concept looks production-ready https://golfclashgemmes.com/mahindra-xuv700-ev-digital-concept-looks-production-ready/ Wed, 18 May 2022 01:45:08 +0000 https://golfclashgemmes.com/mahindra-xuv700-ev-digital-concept-looks-production-ready/ A digital automotive artist has conceptualized an all-electric or EV version of the wildly popular Mahindra XUV700. Demand for the XUV700 is such that waiting times for the premium mid-size SUV extend into 2024 in some cities for some variants. The ultra-modern features and technology have attracted a ton of new buyers, making it the […]]]>

A digital automotive artist has conceptualized an all-electric or EV version of the wildly popular Mahindra XUV700. Demand for the XUV700 is such that waiting times for the premium mid-size SUV extend into 2024 in some cities for some variants. The ultra-modern features and technology have attracted a ton of new buyers, making it the model to beat in the segment. We’ll have to wait to be sure that Mahindra actually plans to offer the electrified version of the SUV soon. Until then, let’s feast our eyes on this digital version.

You might also like: Should you buy a used Audi Q7 or a new Mahindra XUV700?

Mahindra XUV700 EV Electric version of the concept

You might also like: Mahindra XUV700 automatic brakes reduce accident risk with Maruti Eeco

Mahindra XUV700 Electric EV

The concept was rendered by Richtorque. The front fascia of the massive SUV remains identical to the IC-powered version, but there are subtle changes to remind the viewer of its green credentials. This includes a blacked-out sealed grille area because it doesn’t require air, blue accents under the bumper that symbolize the electric powertrain, a chrome plaque with the new Mahindra logo in the center, a pointed splitter with a black protection at the bottom to accentuate the SUV character with a touch of blue tint. From the front, you can see the blue stitching on the head restraints of the front seats bearing the inscription “EV”. The large panoramic sunroof makes an appearance even with the front view depicting its massive size. All in all, one could easily see something like this coming to the production line.

You might also like: The new Mahindra Scorpio and XUV700 are heading to South Africa

Specifications

In the standard version, the XUV700 comes with a 2.0-liter turbocharged petrol unit that produces a maximum power of 200 hp and a maximum torque of 380 Nm. Meanwhile, the diesel engine is available in several tuning states . The lower versions get 155 PS and 360 Nm, while the better positioned models get 185 PS and 420 Nm (450 Nm in the automatic variant). Both petrol and diesel engine variants will be available with 6-speed manual and automatic transmission choices.

You might also like: Ford EcoSport tests the build quality of the Mahindra XUV700 5 stars

The prices vary between Rs 13.18 lakh and Rs 24.58 lakh, ex-showroom. Direct rivals include the likes of Tata Safari, MG Hector Plus and Hyundai Alcazar in 7-seater configurations. What do you think of this Mahindra XUV700 digital EV (electric version)?

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Campaign blog set up to examine South Thanet MP’s Net Zero Scrutiny Group statements – The Isle Of Thanet News https://golfclashgemmes.com/campaign-blog-set-up-to-examine-south-thanet-mps-net-zero-scrutiny-group-statements-the-isle-of-thanet-news/ Sun, 15 May 2022 17:37:32 +0000 https://golfclashgemmes.com/campaign-blog-set-up-to-examine-south-thanet-mps-net-zero-scrutiny-group-statements-the-isle-of-thanet-news/ Switching to greener and cleaner energy Climate change, the actions the UK is taking to tackle it and the response of the Net Zero Scrutiny Group led by South Thanet MP Craig Mackinlay are at the heart of a new campaign blog. The blog, Craig Mackinlay Watch, was started by ‘a group of climate-concerned residents’ […]]]>
Switching to greener and cleaner energy

Climate change, the actions the UK is taking to tackle it and the response of the Net Zero Scrutiny Group led by South Thanet MP Craig Mackinlay are at the heart of a new campaign blog.

The blog, Craig Mackinlay Watch, was started by ‘a group of climate-concerned residents’ who say the MP for South Thanet should support the UK’s drive to take action to eradicate the use of fossil fuels in 2050.

In 2019, the UK became the first major economy in the world to adopt a legally binding target to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions to net zero by 2050.

Some of the measures outlined to achieve this include insulating homes and business premises; installing low-carbon heat pumps and phasing out gas boilers; replacement of petrol and diesel vehicles with zero-emission equivalents (electric vehicles); using ‘clean, green electricity’ rather than carbon-laden gas, with most electricity coming from North Sea wind farms or UK nuclear reactors.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson

Prime Minister Boris Johnson said of the 30-year transition to Net Zero: “Eliminating dirty fossil fuels from the global economy will lead to the creation of vast new global industries, from offshore wind to electric vehicles , including carbon capture and storage”.

The Prime Minister said the plan: “will create and support hundreds of thousands of new, highly skilled, well-paying green jobs”.

The government’s Net Zero review says the policy will have significant co-benefits, such as cleaner air.

He adds: “Improved air quality could deliver £35 billion in economic benefits in the form of reduced damage costs to society, reflecting for example hospital admissions for lower respiratory tract. When these benefits enable a healthier, more productive workforce, they can support long-term growth and productivity improvements.

But the review also admits: “There is significant uncertainty about the precise mix of technologies and their costs.” These costs will also fall on the public in the form of taxes and/or financial outlays for “green” heating equipment, electric vehicles and possible price increases for goods and services due to companies having to adapt to new technologies.

The government will issue a call for evidence on fairness and affordability to help rebalance electricity and gas prices and says it will work with industry to seek cost parity between fuel pumps heat and gas boilers by 2030. A number of subsidy programs will also be used.

Net Zero Review Group

However, the Net Zero Scrutiny Group (NZSG), made up of Conservative backbenchers, opposes many of the government’s net zero policies.

The NZSG says it accepts climate science, but net zero policies are ‘unnumbered fairy tales’.

The group has institutional ties to the Global Warming Policy Foundation (GWPF), which says “predictions of unacceptable warming caused by more carbon dioxide are wrong.”

The NZSG is led by Chairman Craig Mackinlay and Founder Steve Baker. They say people will be hit with huge costs for some of the measures, such as heat pumps replacing gas boilers and switching to electric vehicles.

MP Craig Mackinaly

In a column for The Critic, Mr Mackinlay wrote: “Air-source heat pumps unfortunately fail to heat homes to the temperatures we are used to, cost more to operate, perform particularly poorly in winter and require large water storage tanks. There is no technology to stylishly replace the gas boiler and I have yet to find a voter who would be willing to pay £20,000 to be cooler and face higher bills.

On electric vehicles, he said: “The use of electric cars, which are already much more expensive than their petrol equivalents and have obvious range and charging limits, are made more expensive if the prices of electricity increases to accommodate large amounts of additional offshore wind power or increased reliance on mainland interconnections providing electricity from coal.

“There are few government plans to supply the millions of charging stations, no thought about the safety or availability of the supply of rare metals to make the batteries and even less about the true CO2 cost of mining the ore, the manufacture of new cars, new batteries or the national upgrade of the electricity grid to be supplied.

The Craig Mackinlay Watch Group

The Craig Mackinlay Watch Group claims that the claims of the Net Zero Scrutiny Group are not supported by scientific evidence.

Taking inspiration from the Steve Baker Watch campaign, the group says it is monitoring Mr Mackinlay’s own blog and various other sources he relies on for comments that contradict climate science, and will report them alongside the current scientific opinion of experts.

A spokesperson said: “Climate change is a critical issue and its effects will have a very significant impact on all aspects of life for Craig Mackinlay constituents: everything including their quality of life, standard of living and their food security.

“Mr. Mackinlay is chairman of the climate change doubt group Net Zero Scrutiny Group, a spin-off of the Global Warming Policy Foundation (GWPF). The group claims to “highlight and discuss the serious implications of costly and poorly considered climate change policies”, but their views are fringe theories which we believe are not supported by mainstream science and often contain ” unsubstantiated facts which are not confirmed by the evidence.

“Mr. Mackinlay is keen to highlight the costs of action to avoid or mitigate the worst consequences of climate change. However, it does not highlight the costs of not taking effective action or the climate consequences already entrenched in our future.

“Given he is the MP for South Thanet, Mr Mackinlay has been strangely silent about the effects rising sea levels will have on his constituents. Expert projections show that the annual flood level from 2030 will cause enough flooding in the Wantsum to cut Thanet off from the ‘mainland’. According to these projections, significant areas of land from Reculver to Sandwich will be under water.

In red: Areas likely to be below the annual flood stage due to sea level rise in 2030 and beyond Source: climatecentral.org

“Craig Mackinlay Watch is a multi-partisan, multi-religious campaign with no other goal than to make sure local people know the truth. All of the peer-reviewed scientific evidence points to climate change being real, happening. is happening now and is potentially catastrophic. We cannot delay action any longer.

“We believe our MP should support the established work of the vast majority of experienced climate scientists rather than using obfuscation to delay the implementation of critically important changes in the way we use and save energy. . The NZSG claims to help the poor by blocking costly ‘net zero’ policies, when in fact increased renewable energy generation and better home insulation policies could have avoided the rising costs of electricity caused by soaring world gas prices and halting funding for the Russian war effort.

Mr Mackinlay said the Net Zero route would cause ‘social calamity for those in Britain least able to pay its cost’.

The government’s climate change advisory committee has said the cost of net zero measures will be £50billion a year in 2050. Mr Mackinlay says the government’s own figures show the cost is more likely to be £50bn a year in 2050. £70 billion a year.

He also says the UK should reconsider the use of shale gas – the process of recovering gas and oil from shale rock by drilling (known as hydraulic fracturing).

He said: “Renewables have a role to play, perhaps in the longer term as technology evolves, but we have a problem here and now.

“We should be much further along in replacing our aging nuclear power plants which are now reaching the end of their useful life. We should have been much further ahead in making sure we use the gift of domestic gas that mother nature has blessed us with rather than relying more and more on expensive and potentially insecure foreign imports that support hostile regimes including geopolitics is now very real on the border of Ukraine.

“Should we ‘fracture’ – I think we most certainly should, as it would create tens of thousands of jobs, bring in billions of pounds in positive tax revenue and most certainly contribute to the perpetual balance of payments deficit from the United Kingdom…

“I have no major objections to renewables and I am positively in favor of leaving a cleaner world than we found – the energy mix is ​​sound, but does our momentum towards Net Zero give us – (a) energy security, (b) affordability, (c) practical solutions that improve lives, (d) are the vulnerable and the lowest paid protected and (e) are there a better way?

“The current strategy fails in measures (a) to (d), which leads to the natural conclusion of (e). Even if renewable energies could be developed and the storage of excess electrical energy feasible at a reasonable cost , none of this can happen overnight.

“Even then, given the risk to the grid, as seen with severe storms in the north of the country, is it reasonable to be 100% dependent on electricity for all our motive power needs, heating and cooking? Gas will be an important part of the mix for many years to come, regardless of the pipe dreams. »

Fracking was halted in the UK in 2019 following pressure from climate groups and residents over fears the process would cause earthquakes.

Crowdfunding

The Craig Mackinlay Watch group is also on Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/CraigMackinlayWatch – and has launched a crowdfunding campaign at https://www.crowdfunder.co.uk/p/craig-mackinlay-watch to raise funds to raise awareness, print leaflets to inform Thanet residents, set up stalls downtown to distribute leaflets and information, and encourage residents to contact their MP to raise their climate concerns.

Craig Mackinlay Watch blog can be found here

The Net Zero review can be found here

Mr. Mackinlay’s article for The Critic can be found here

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World Championship Recap: May 13 | BLOG https://golfclashgemmes.com/world-championship-recap-may-13-blog/ Fri, 13 May 2022 20:18:21 +0000 https://golfclashgemmes.com/world-championship-recap-may-13-blog/ The 2022 IIHF World Championship kicked off Friday in Finland. For more details on how the Devils players performed, read below. CANADA 5, GERMANY 3 Canada: Damon Severson, Ryan Graves, Dawson Mercer Pierre-Luc Dubois scored twice for Canada as they triumphed 5-3 against Germany on Friday at the Ice Hotel in Helsinki. Cole Sillinger, Kent […]]]>

The 2022 IIHF World Championship kicked off Friday in Finland. For more details on how the Devils players performed, read below.

CANADA 5, GERMANY 3

Canada: Damon Severson, Ryan Graves, Dawson Mercer

Pierre-Luc Dubois scored twice for Canada as they triumphed 5-3 against Germany on Friday at the Ice Hotel in Helsinki. Cole Sillinger, Kent Johnson and Noah Gregor also scored for Team Canada.

Devils center Dawson Mercer had an assist in the game. Devils defensemen Damon Severson (20:51) and Ryan Graves (16:28) both recorded significant ice time. Graves added two shots and a plus-1.

Next: Canada will face Italy on Sunday.

USA 4, LATVIA 1

United States: Jon GilliesLuke Hughes

Defender Seth Jones scored two points (1G-1A) as the United States edged Latvia 4-1 on Friday at Nokia Arena. Sam Lafferty, Thomas Bordeleau and Riley Barber also scored for America, while Devils defensive prospect Luke Hughes recorded 16:11 minutes of ice time.

Next: The Americans will face Austria on Sunday.

SLOVAKIA 4, FRANCE 2

Slovakia: Tomas Tatar

Forward Tomas Tatar scored a second-half goal as Slovakia beat France, 4-2, on Friday at the Ice Hotel in Helsinki. Tatar also had three shots in 18:38 minutes of ice time.

Pavol Regenda scored two goals on four shots for Slovakia, while winger Juraj Slafkovsky, an expected high draft pick in 2022, had two assists, three shots and a plus-1.

Next: Slovakia take on Germany on Saturday.

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BSU students embark on a 10-day exploration of national parks https://golfclashgemmes.com/bsu-students-embark-on-a-10-day-exploration-of-national-parks/ Thu, 12 May 2022 09:16:49 +0000 https://golfclashgemmes.com/bsu-students-embark-on-a-10-day-exploration-of-national-parks/ The American Association of Geographers funds a trip to national parks MEDIA CONTACT: David Thompson, dlthompson@bowiestate.edu, 301-860-4311 (BOWIE, Md.) – Classes are over and most students are preparing for their summer vacation or graduation, except for 10 students from Bowie State University who are preparing to leave for a camping trip. of 10 days and […]]]>

The American Association of Geographers funds a trip to national parks

MEDIA CONTACT: David Thompson, dlthompson@bowiestate.edu, 301-860-4311

(BOWIE, Md.) – Classes are over and most students are preparing for their summer vacation or graduation, except for 10 students from Bowie State University who are preparing to leave for a camping trip. of 10 days and 1,500 miles in five national parks to experience the outdoors, explore the physical geography, history and cultural landscape of the western United States. Through experiential learning, students will gain knowledge of geography, national park sites, preparing for outdoor travel, and camping.

“Bowie State is the first and only HBCU to receive a grant from the American Association of Geographers, which made this trip a reality for our students,” said Dr. Sumanth Reddy, professor of geography at BSU.

The national park system has been considered America’s best idea, but not all Americans are able to engage with these precious national treasures. Recent studies estimate that only 1.2-6% of visitors to national parks in the United States are African American, which is considerably lower than the 13% of the American population who are African American.

“In addition to their participation in the trip, students will be required to create a video, write an article, blog or post on a topic of their choice related to what they saw, experienced and learned during the trip. They will also be eligible for receive 3 to 6 independent study credits in Geography,” Professor Reddy said.

Students will visit five parks: Great Sand Dunes National Park, Mesa Verde National Park, Grand Canyon National Park, Arches National Park, and Rocky Mountain National Park. They will also visit the Four Corners Monument, which marks the point in the southwestern United States where the states of Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico and Utah meet. It is the nation’s only point shared by four states and is maintained by the Navajo Nation.

“African Americans have made major contributions to the Rocky Mountain and desert regions of the southwestern United States,” Professor Reddy said. “My goal is to take students to various areas where African Americans are part of the cultural landscape, such as the Black American West Museum and the Five Points Neighborhood in Denver, and the Fort Garland Museum and Cultural Center (Buffalo Soldier exhibit ) in Fort Garland, Colorado.

In addition to participating in the trip, students will be required to create a video, write an article, blog, or post on a topic of their choice related to what they saw, experienced, and learned on the trip. They will also be eligible to receive 3 to 6 independent study credits in Geography.

The BSU students participating in the 10-day National Parks camping trip are Kevon Allen, a sophomore and elementary education student; Alma Bangura, a young government student; Zoey Days, junior biology student; Malaika Dixon, a computer science major; Kalil Greenfield Jr., a sophomore in history; Kwari Jackson, sophomore in history; Ayen Kuol, graduate student in computer science; Rodah Ngorem, second-year student majoring in nursing; Bridget Oppong, junior computer science student; and Mark Sims Jr., a freshman majoring in communications.

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About Bowie State University
Bowie State University (BSU) is a leading portal to higher education for qualified individuals from diverse academic and socioeconomic backgrounds seeking a high-quality, affordable, comprehensive public university. The university places special emphasis on science, technology, cybersecurity, teacher education, business, and nursing within the context of a liberal arts education. For more information on BSU, visit bowiestate.edu.

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Water safety and stressed life jackets at Utah Lake | News, Sports, Jobs https://golfclashgemmes.com/water-safety-and-stressed-life-jackets-at-utah-lake-news-sports-jobs/ Sun, 08 May 2022 15:29:21 +0000 https://golfclashgemmes.com/water-safety-and-stressed-life-jackets-at-utah-lake-news-sports-jobs/ Ashtyn Asay, Daily Herald Utah Lake is photographed from Utah Lake State Park on Monday, April 25, 2022. This is the time of year when more and more people start having fun on Utah Lake. This month, the Utah Lake Commission is hosting a Water Safety Awareness Campaign to ensure […]]]>




Ashtyn Asay, Daily Herald

Utah Lake is photographed from Utah Lake State Park on Monday, April 25, 2022.

This is the time of year when more and more people start having fun on Utah Lake. This month, the Utah Lake Commission is hosting a Water Safety Awareness Campaign to ensure that anyone considering getting in the water knows how to stay safe and has the tools to do so.

“Every life lost impacts a family,” reads a blog post from the Utah Lake Commission. “In May 2020, Priscilla Bienkowski and Sophia Hernandez, two teenage friends from Saratoga Springs, were reported missing after swimming near the Knolls area on the west side of Utah Lake. Eight days later, their bodies were found miles from where they entered the lake.

After this tragedy, family members and friends of the two girls contacted the Utah County Commission in July 2020. They suggested that a free life jacket loan station be available near the entrance. of The Knolls so people can borrow life jackets. The Utah Lake Commission has since partnered with both families to develop their idea; making it a lake-wide lifejacket lending program with six initial stations at public access points around the lake with more to come.

The Utah Lake Life Jacket Loaner Program provides the public with free use of life jackets on a first-come, first-served basis. According to the commission’s website, research shows that most drownings could have been prevented if a life jacket had been worn by the victim. “The objectives of this program are to increase the wearing of lifejackets during aquatic activities as well as to educate the visiting public on the importance of proper lifejacket use and fit and safety aquatic,” reads the site.

According to Sam Braegger, Awareness Coordinator, several fundraising and information efforts continue throughout May, National Water Safety Awareness Month, to help with the lifejacket loaner program and to other security efforts.

Isaac Hale, Daily Herald file photo

An official aboard a Utah State Parks boat searches for two missing teenagers near the Knolls camping area along the western shore of Utah Lake near State Route 68 on Thursday May 07, 2020. The two teenagers, Priscilla Bienkowski, 18, and Sophia Hernandez, 17, were reported missing after swimming in Utah Lake, and search and rescue teams from the Utah County Sheriff’s Office searched for teenagers.

Braegger said there are currently five lifejacket loaner stations nearing completion with more to be added in the coming years. “Nationally, 80% of people who drown in boating accidents would have survived if they had been wearing a life jacket,” he said. “We want to make life jackets available to help people stay safe while on the lake.”

On May 7, the Paddle with Care Memorial Fundraiser was held where participants paddled from Vineyard Beach to American Fork Marina. There were educational booths about water safety and Utah Lake, as well as food and activities.

For more information about Utah Lake’s lifejacket loaner program and how monetary and lifejacket donations can be made, people can visit http://utahlake.org.

Members of the Utah Lake Photography Club submitted photos of the lake and its surroundings for a fundraising exhibit. The exhibition will run until May 31. The Photography Club is partnered with the Utah Lake Commission, Allen’s Camera, and SCERA Center for the Arts as an in-person and online photo gallery that anyone can purchase. Fifty percent of the proceeds go to the operation of the Utah Lake lifejacket loaner program.

Jason Robison’s “Shattered by Sunset” is one of the photos on display during May as part of the fundraiser for the Utah Lake Photo Exhibit, held at the SCERA Center for the Arts, Gallery 101.

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Washington Classical Review » Blog Archive » Christian Reif Brings Excitement and Eagerness to Baltimore Symphony Orchestra Program https://golfclashgemmes.com/washington-classical-review-blog-archive-christian-reif-brings-excitement-and-eagerness-to-baltimore-symphony-orchestra-program/ Fri, 06 May 2022 16:59:40 +0000 https://golfclashgemmes.com/washington-classical-review-blog-archive-christian-reif-brings-excitement-and-eagerness-to-baltimore-symphony-orchestra-program/ Christian Reif conducted the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra Thursday night at the Music Center in Strathmore. Photo: David Kim The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra is looking for a new music director to replace Marin Alsop, who resigned last September. Each guest conductor who steps onto the podium with the ensemble could become a candidate for the position, […]]]>

Christian Reif conducted the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra Thursday night at the Music Center in Strathmore. Photo: David Kim

The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra is looking for a new music director to replace Marin Alsop, who resigned last September. Each guest conductor who steps onto the podium with the ensemble could become a candidate for the position, although the orchestra management has not yet given any indications. The latest young face to take the helm was German-born bandleader Christian Reif, with a varied program on Thursday night at the Music Center in Strathmore.

Reif is at the start of his career, following studies and residencies at Juilliard, New World Symphony, San Francisco Symphony and Tanglewood. This season, he’s taking a number of guest tours at various locations. He is currently Music Director of the Lakes Area Music Festival in Minnesota. He may be familiar to those who have spent the pandemic lockdowns watching live concerts, from a video concert he made for NPR with his wife, soprano Julia Bullock.

As in this online performance, Reif’s main asset turned out to be his musicality and sensitivity as an accompanist. It opened with “Mänadentanz”, an orchestral arrangement of a lively scene from Hans Werner Henze’s opera The Bassarids. Last heard by the NSO in 2013 under Christoph von Dohnányi, it depicts the abrupt end of the ruler of Thebes, Pentheus. Tricked by Dionysus into participating in the god’s frenzied celebrations, Pentheus disguises himself as a woman. Discovered, he is torn apart by the Maenads, among them his own mother and sister.

Reif directed the work with admirable gestural precision, signaling the stacking of entries with crisp efficiency. Giving the opulent array of percussion instruments an almost limitless range, this rendition brought out the Bernstein-like revelry of the bacchanalia. At the climax, beautiful solos from horn and principal cellist Dariusz Skoraczewski, giving voice to the dying Pentheus, had room to sing along. A fury of clashes in the orchestra swelled to a discordant climax.

Reif’s best work came in a deftly etched rendition of Mozart’s Symphony No. 39, the least beloved of the composer’s last three symphonies, composed as a set in the summer of 1788. Particular attention to differences in articulation helped sculpt the slow introduction to the first movement, but a rushing tempo in the Allegro section gave more than a wild rush. The emphasis in fast movements was too much on impetuous speed.

Too bad, because the delicate second movement has established itself as an utterly charming Mozart. The beat had forward movement but allowed every detail to be smoothly put together, with seamless balances throughout. The Menuetto seemed too brisk for an Allegretto, a haste that stood out even more in the charming Trio, where the clarinetist and flautist added dizzying ornaments over the two repetitions. With a little more space, it could have equaled the slow movement of charm.

The BSO musicians could certainly play the finale as fast as Reif pushed them, but the results were harassed. In the third and fourth movements, Reif lost control of the whole thing a bit, as sections occasionally rushed past the already brisk pace. His dance moves and showboating hand gestures also distracted from the music. A more minimal ride might have kept things together more effectively.

Awadagin Pratt. Photo: Rob Davidson

The BSO has co-commissioned the new piano concerto Sleeves by composer Jessie Montgomery, who opened the second half. Created in March by the Hilton Head Symphony Orchestra, it’s a brilliant piece, given a relaxed atmosphere by its soloist, pianist Awadagin Pratt, and the strings of the BSO. Pratt rolled easily through the initial running figures on the keyboard, with a descending melody marked by the motifs, somewhat reminiscent of Ravel’s style.

Montgomery’s harmonic palette in the piece is pleasingly varied, as the second section featured a more active theme in bitonal chords, echoes of Stravinsky Petrushka. In his program note, Montgomery compared these musical ideas to birds flying in circles and endless patterns of fractals. These ideas returned in a rondo form throughout the piece, alternating with slow interludes, the shimmering meditation of the piano backed by unison melodies and roaring patterns in the strings.

A long cadence marked the approach of the final statement of the main theme. This solo passage was partly left to Pratt to improvise, and it meandered loosely through a number of ideas. The hammered octaves led to a moment of surprise, with some notes struck directly on the strings directly under the piano lid.

This new concerto, also inspired by the dance theme that was at the heart of this program, diverted the ear and the mind, without making much noise with a virtuoso firework display for soloist or ensemble.

Where the orchestra needed a more seasoned hand the most was in Strauss’ Suite conclusive The Rider of the Rose. With large orchestral forces, as in the “Mänadentanz,” Reif tried to micromanage the vast panoply of detail, but the added fuss obscured more than clarified. The individual musical contributions were solid, including the horn solos in the overly rambunctious opening and the soft sigh of the oboe, accompanied by the shimmering chords of the Silver Rose music.

Reif made the best effect in the mid-section waltzes, full of Viennese rhythmic hesitations and sentimentality of the heart on the fretboard. Concertmaster Jonathon Carney sweetened the pot with nostalgic violin solos, but the Trio and Duo sections based on the opera’s poignant final scene felt rushed. The breathless return of the Silver Rose chords, embellishing the end of the Octavian-Sophie duet, underlined the excessively fast tempo. The chaos of the conclusion, the cacophonous music surrounding Ochs’ exit earlier in the third act, was maximum.

The program will be repeated at 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 3 p.m. Sunday at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall. bsomusic.org

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GoI’s e-commerce network for small players is a good idea. The customer interface will be essential https://golfclashgemmes.com/gois-e-commerce-network-for-small-players-is-a-good-idea-the-customer-interface-will-be-essential/ Sun, 01 May 2022 20:45:00 +0000 https://golfclashgemmes.com/gois-e-commerce-network-for-small-players-is-a-good-idea-the-customer-interface-will-be-essential/ The GoI’s quest to create an open digital e-commerce network for small businesses holds great promise. The proposed model has the potential to be a game-changer for small retailers and new tech startups facing big e-commerce giants and their market dominance and commissions. It can also address sellers’ limitations of being tied to a single […]]]>

The GoI’s quest to create an open digital e-commerce network for small businesses holds great promise. The proposed model has the potential to be a game-changer for small retailers and new tech startups facing big e-commerce giants and their market dominance and commissions. It can also address sellers’ limitations of being tied to a single platform and the supposedly opaque algorithms they use to prioritize certain sellers. Brick-and-mortar retail still accounts for well over 90% of retail sales, but mom-and-pop stores that drive a large share of consumer goods sales (75-80%) are feeling the heat from e-commerce players aggressively targeting new customers. segments like groceries, promising 10 -minute deliveries.

After its technological successes of the Aadhaar system and the UPI digital payment solution, GoI can rightly claim a good track record. Another promising digital venture is the National Digital Health Mission which aims to digitize the health records of all citizens. And it’s good that the presence of e-commerce giants Amazon and Walmart-owned Flipkart didn’t intimidate the GoI. There is economic logic in safeguarding livelihoods in the unorganized retail sector and boosting MSMEs, as long as this is not done by introducing distortion or discrimination. The involvement of Nandan Nilekani, who played a key role in the conceptualization of Aadhaar and UPI, for the Open Network for Digital Commerce (ONDC), also added weight to the project.

But unlike digital payments and the pioneering UPI, e-commerce has dominant players with user-friendly websites and apps, excellent customer service, and fast delivery networks. ONDC-based offers must be equally good to attract sellers and customers. And the smart, non-disruptive solution will be to allow existing e-commerce players to operate as-is, with their proprietary technologies for supplier onboarding, inventory, price discovery, and delivery logistics. ONDC, with its premise of greater cross-platform visibility and the ability to discover sellers, should not be imposed on anyone. If the interoperable networks and applications built on ONDC facilitate tasks such as cataloging, inventory management, order fulfillment and delivery logistics, buyers and sellers would be automatically attracted. ONDC can also help tomorrow’s e-commerce/tech startups save redundant investments in the e-commerce network and focus on customer acquisition. Next month’s ONDC pilot project will be followed closely.



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This article appeared as an editorial opinion in the print edition of the Times of India.



END OF ARTICLE



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How water became a weapon, the problem of food insecurity in the Caribbean and from blogging to a $25 million business https://golfclashgemmes.com/how-water-became-a-weapon-the-problem-of-food-insecurity-in-the-caribbean-and-from-blogging-to-a-25-million-business/ Fri, 29 Apr 2022 18:31:45 +0000 https://golfclashgemmes.com/how-water-became-a-weapon-the-problem-of-food-insecurity-in-the-caribbean-and-from-blogging-to-a-25-million-business/ IIt’s been a busy week on the pace of food and agriculture: there was the House Agriculture Committee hearing of top meatpacking industry CEOs, there was there was Beyond Meat’s pop of McPlant’s fake news, and there was the first case in the United States of bird flu being transmitted to humans. The Colorado-based worker […]]]>

IIt’s been a busy week on the pace of food and agriculture: there was the House Agriculture Committee hearing of top meatpacking industry CEOs, there was there was Beyond Meat’s pop of McPlant’s fake news, and there was the first case in the United States of bird flu being transmitted to humans. The Colorado-based worker who tested positive was employed on a farm facing an outbreak in his herd, and while the virus is unlikely to mutate enough to transfer easily between humans, the case serves as a reminder that the next pandemic could come from a factory farm.

My own reports still immerse me deeply in the world of water and where it is scarce. It makes me follow my own consumption of the vital liquid in my daily life, maybe a little also a lot.

— Chloé Sorvino, editor

It’s Forbes’ Fresh Take newsletter, bringing you the latest news every Friday on the big ideas that are changing the future of food. Want to get it in your inbox every week? register here.


What’s new

Water is emerging as a weapon of war in Ukraine and beyond. Thirst can kill, as can hunger, when essential agriculture dries up. History by yours truly.

In the Caribbean, severe food insecurity has increased. A series of World Food Program surveys found that in the English-speaking Caribbean, severe food insecurity has increased by 72% since the start of the pandemic, reports Daphne Ewing-Chow.

How deliciously Ella built a $25 million plant-based business. When Ella Mills launched her plant-based recipe blog, Deliciously Ella, in 2012, business was far from a priority. After spending a year in and out of hospital with illnesses that left her mental and physical health at rock bottom, the 20-year-old simply wanted to explore the effects that dieting less transformed could have on his health. And learn to cook in the process, writes Lela London.


II miss my trip to California last month and that little gem salad topped with anchovies from Gjusta in Venice Beach. I couldn’t resist a piece of polenta cake with orange marmalade to complete my spread.


Chloe Sorvino leads food and agriculture coverage as a staff writer on Forbes’ corporate team. Her nearly eight years of reporting at Forbes have taken her to In-N-Out Burger’s secretive test kitchen, to drought-ravaged farms in California’s Central Valley, to burned-out national forests logged by a timber billionaire, to a century-old slaughterhouse in Omaha, and even a chocolate croissant factory designed like a medieval castle in northern France. His book, Raw Deal: Hidden corruption, corporate greed and the fight for the future of meat will be published in December 2022 by Simon & Schuster’s Atria Books.

Thanks for reading the 33rd edition of Forbes Fresh Take! Let me know what you think. Subscribe to Forbes Fresh Take here.

More from Forbes Fresh Take:


MORE FORBESNew Take: What the Western Drought Means for Food, Why the Food Industry Needs Economic Justice, and Have We Hit the Peak of Vegan Chicken Nuggets?
MORE FORBESFresh Take: What it takes to feed Ukraine, the 2022 Dirty Dozen and is it really antibiotic-free?
MORE FORBESFresh Take: Costco rotisserie chicken supply in jeopardy, why food shouldn’t be used as a weapon, grocers must strike

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Inside Water with Isabel – Villanova University https://golfclashgemmes.com/inside-water-with-isabel-villanova-university/ Wed, 27 Apr 2022 21:18:49 +0000 https://golfclashgemmes.com/inside-water-with-isabel-villanova-university/ Hey Wildcats! I apologize for my unplanned hiatus from the blog – the conference games really took over me and somehow the blog took a step back. For those of you who haven’t heard, our season ended on Easter weekend with great wins against La Salle on Friday and against VMI on Saturday. And while […]]]>

Hey Wildcats!

I apologize for my unplanned hiatus from the blog – the conference games really took over me and somehow the blog took a step back. For those of you who haven’t heard, our season ended on Easter weekend with great wins against La Salle on Friday and against VMI on Saturday. And while we did our best in those two games, we just missed out on the MAAC Championship Tournament, which was our original goal for the season. Regardless of the outcome, I’m extremely proud of our team and all the hard work we’ve put in to make it happen.

So, this being my last blog, I thought I would share a reflection on the team and program that have hosted me for the past four years. One thing I couldn’t help but think about for the past few weeks is the fact that when you’re a freshman, you have no idea what your team will look like when you’re a senior. You can’t even begin to imagine a team with just your own classmates and none of the upperclassmen. And one thing is certain: I could never, in my wildest dreams, imagine a team like this. The support, friendship, sense of belonging and so much more that I have received from this team is absolutely invaluable to me. I don’t think I’ll ever be able to write or capture all the ways this team made Villanova home or made me who I am today.

Being a college athlete isn’t easy; in one of our many boardroom meetings, Coach told us, “If it were easy, there would be a lot more people in this room right now.” And it’s not always easy, I can say with confidence that the aspects of the team that I like far outweigh the things that I didn’t like. Although I didn’t like getting up early for lifts, I loved cheering each other on as we lifted heavier than the week before. While I didn’t always enjoy those last few hours on the bus back from VMI, I loved how we always managed to end up laughing and joking, no matter how long the ride was. Although there were days when the first dip in the water was so daunting, I loved the competition and camaraderie in the pool with my best friends. I loved all the “good shots” and “good blocks” that echoed during the warm-up shoot. I loved the pre-workout discussions, whether it was the MAAC standings or whether Emily would slip or sink if she jumped in the pool on a boogie board. I love every way the team has evolved into something I didn’t see coming.

To my team: It has been an honor and a privilege to be your teammate, captain and friend. It was an honor and a privilege to compete with you, to win and to lose with you. It strikes me now how honored and privileged it was to do all those little things with you. Splitting a lane, reviewing plays, locking in center, warming up play, high fives after bases, throwing lacrosse balls in softball mitts, trying to juggle, centering work in the shallow end, running towards the corner, birthday dances and every moment in between. I could never express my love for all of you. I know your future is incredibly bright (in and out of the pool) and I look forward to following you and seeing where you go in the years to come.

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How a Polish immigrant built a brand of vodka that supports relief efforts in Ukraine | Peninsula Foodist | The peninsula foodist https://golfclashgemmes.com/how-a-polish-immigrant-built-a-brand-of-vodka-that-supports-relief-efforts-in-ukraine-peninsula-foodist-the-peninsula-foodist/ Tue, 26 Apr 2022 05:28:18 +0000 https://golfclashgemmes.com/how-a-polish-immigrant-built-a-brand-of-vodka-that-supports-relief-efforts-in-ukraine-peninsula-foodist-the-peninsula-foodist/ By Zack Fernandes Rocket Vodka founder Dariusz Paczuski in his garage in Menlo Park. Photo by Magali Gauthier. Like so many tales of Silicon Valley entrepreneurship, Rocket Vodka’s origin story is set in a garage. But it wasn’t a technological revolution that Menlo Park founder and resident Dariusz Paczuski was chasing – it was the […]]]>

By Zack Fernandes

Rocket Vodka founder Dariusz Paczuski in his garage in Menlo Park. Photo by Magali Gauthier.

Like so many tales of Silicon Valley entrepreneurship, Rocket Vodka’s origin story is set in a garage. But it wasn’t a technological revolution that Menlo Park founder and resident Dariusz Paczuski was chasing – it was the memory of apples from his childhood and the desire to make premium vodka.

Although Paczuski’s first distillation took place in a garage in Menlo Park, he says his connection to spirit runs deep and goes back a long way. “The first time I drank it was vodka,” he says, adding that “vodka has always been my spirit of choice.” Born in Poland but raised in the UK and Norway, Paczuski’s earliest memories of vodka at the dining table are a guideline of his Polish heritage, with shots of vodka serving as the de facto drink and a perfect foil for the salty, the rich and the meaty. -laden kitchen around which he grew up.

When Paczuski’s parents saved enough money to buy the family’s first home in the Norwegian town of Drammen, they found themselves on a property that also had apple trees in its backyard. As a child, Paczuski was often sent to harvest fruit that had fallen from the ground. “They were the sweetest and ripest,” he recalls, describing the apples his mother pressed for his father to ferment into alcohol.


Dariusz Paczuski’s father picks apples in their garden in Norway, where Paczuski grew up, in this photograph taken in the late 1970s. Photo courtesy of Dariusz Paczuski.

The son of a glassblower and an amateur distiller himself, Paczuski’s father had used old tools to reconstruct a makeshift still from copper pipes in the family’s root cellar. There he would distill the fermented apple cider into a spirit before aging it in barrels to make an apple brandy. “During the distillation phase, when it (the spirit) was starting to drip, it would let me put my little finger in it and taste it,” says Paczuski. It was the memory of this apple brandy that later inspired Paczuski to produce his apple-based vodka.

The Nordic backdrop of Paczuski’s childhood not only set the stage for a future in artisanal minds: it also inspired him with a love of skiing. Several years later, after moving to the United States, Paczuski would earn the nickname “The Polish Rocket” from a pal, a reference to his penchant for speed on the tracks. Paczuski tidied it up in his mind as the perfect name for a brand of vodka – an idea he had already started toying with.

In 2015 Paczuski was introduced to a local distiller through a mutual friend. The distiller, who worked at Google by day, had made batches of his own vodka and was happy to be a resource. With some guidance, Paczuski decided to give it a shot.

“I went to the Menlo Park Farmer’s Market. I bought Granny Smith, Red Delicious and Fuji apples,” says Paczuski, intent on finding the perfect varietal for vodka production. After coring and mashing the apples, he mixed them with warm water and yeast and left them to ferment for three weeks.

This first batch was mostly unsuccessful. As Paczuski learned, not all ferments are created equal, and making vodka from apples would prove a bit more difficult than making it from grains, potatoes, or corn (some of the basic ingredients typical of vodka).

Granny Smith’s juice had moldy, even giving Paczuski a rash after tasting the ferment. The Red Delicious juice didn’t seem dangerous, but didn’t fare much better, as the apple flesh was too fibrous and lacking in fermentable sugars to produce enough alcohol. But with Fuji apple juice, Paczuski had found success. He’ll eventually settle for a mix of Fuji and Golden Delicious apples, with added apple juice and concentrate to boost natural sugar levels and aid fermentation.


Rocket Vodka is made from apples harvested near Sacramento that are fermented and distilled in small batches. Photo courtesy of Rocket Vodka.

Today, Rocket Vodka has expanded its operations from a garage to the Dry Diggings distillery in El Dorado Hills, northeast of Sacramento. There, apples harvested from nearby Apple Hill are fermented and distilled in small batches into a 190-degree alcoholic spirit (i.e. 95% ABV) before being cut into a more palatable vodka. at 80 degrees (40% ABV), with mountain water from the Sierra Nevada foothills.

The brand has grown steadily and retailers like The Willows Market (Rocket Vodka’s first retail distribution account), Draeger’s Market and K&L Wine Merchants, as well as bars and restaurants like Ettan, Terún and Flea Street Cafe , all in stock Rocket vodka on shelves or behind the bar.

Although Paczuski, who also has a job in marketing, runs Rocket Vodka with the care and attention of a full-time business, it ultimately falls somewhere between a passion project and a side hustle for him. “I’m in no rush to make this a multi-billion dollar brand,” says Paczuski, noting that this approach gives the company some flexibility to do good.

In late February, as images of the Russian invasion of Ukraine dominated the news cycle and refugees began arriving in Paczuski’s native Poland, he thought of his own parents, who fled the country. to escape Soviet oppression. Paczuski was not alone – his business partner, Dmitry Lipkin, was born in Ukraine, in the now beleaguered city of Kharkiv. “The hospital I was born in, the school I went to, the building I grew up in…everything was demolished,” Lipkin says.

Given the popularity of vodka in Eastern Europe, Paczuski’s two worlds began to collide. Stories began to appear of bars and liquor stores removing Russian vodka from their shelves. “A lot of people were suggesting to me like, ‘Oh, you should enjoy it,'” Paczuski says. “It didn’t feel right to me…I don’t want to be a war profiteer.”

Less than a week after the invasion, Paczuski, his wife, and Lipkin came together to figure out how Rocket Vodka could help. Lipkin went so far as to consider flying to Ukraine to try to help in some way, an idea his wife would later dissuade him from. But after seeing that World Central Kitchen – the aid organization founded by celebrity chef José Andrés – had taken on the cause of feeding people displaced by the war on the Polish border, Paczuski and Lipkin took a decision.


Rocket Vodka founder Dariusz Paczuski and Flea Street Cafe owner Jesse Cool teamed up for a cocktail served at the cafe to raise money for organizations helping Ukrainian refugees. Photo courtesy of Rocket Vodka.

“It was the most obvious choice for us,” Paczuski says of their decision to support World Central Kitchen. In a video statement posted to Rocket Vodka’s social media accounts, Paczuski and Lipkin announced that they would be donating 100% of Rocket Vodka’s profits for the month of March to World Central Kitchen, an effort that would raise nearly $4,000. to the organization. Rocket Vodka has also teamed up with Flea Street Cafe in Menlo Park to place a special cocktail on the menu: The Peace Rocket, made with Rocket vodka, Cointreau orange liqueur, cranberry and lime juice. Flea Street donated proceeds from the sale of the cocktail and a Ukrainian borscht to World Central Kitchen and Nova Ukraine, a Ukrainian humanitarian organization.

In the weeks since these fundraising efforts began, the war in Ukraine has continued to escalate. Lipkin’s hometown of Kharkiv came under sustained attack, with a Russian missile strike reportedly destroying a local restaurant that World Central Kitchen used to prepare food. The evolving situation has led Rocket Vodka to extend its fundraising efforts through April, for as long as the company can sustain it.

As Paczuski looks to the future of Rocket Vodka, he says he wants it to be widely recognized as “a great vodka brand.” He just might get his wish – Rocket Vodka has won numerous awards at spirits competitions, including being named Best Vodka at the 2017 SIP Awards International Spirits Competition.

Paczuski would like to thank the universe for playing a role in Rocket’s success, noting the random presence of chance that led him to taste his father’s apple brandy to find an expert distiller. at home and, ultimately, to be able to help the humanitarian efforts on the ground. in his homeland. “In life, but especially with Rocket, serendipity is key.”

Email Contributing Editor Zack Fernandes at [email protected]

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